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QCC (COCOBOD) Gets First Quality Accreditations Standard in West Africa.

The United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO), Government of Ghana, Government of Switzerland and Quality Control Company Limited (QCC) on Tuesday 24th September launch a new country programme to improve trade quality and standards of cashew, oil palm and cocoa exports in Accra at the Swiss Spirit Alisa Hotel.

The Global Quality and Standards Programme (GQSP) is an innovative programme developed by the Swiss State Secretariat for Economic Affairs (SECO) and UNIDO to address country-specific quality and standards compliance capacity challenges in partner countries to facilitate market access for SMEs in selected value chains. Today’s launch has made Ghana achieved yet another major milestone in cementing its position as the world’s second-largest producer of cocoa beans.

In addition to the launch of the program today, UNIDO also accredited QCC with two quality certificates meant for cocoa testing and inspection :

  1. ISO IEC 17020
  2. ISO IEC 17025.

Speaking at the ceremony, Dr. Ebenezer Owusu, Chairman of the Board of Quantity Control Company, said COCOBOD was the first organization to attain the accreditations in the West African Sub-region.

Swiss Ambassador to Ghana, Phillip Stalder, congratulated COCOBOD, saying these accreditations are achievements which mark a significant milestone for the Ghanaian cocoa industry.

He expressed the belief that with appropriate investment, the Ghanaian cocoa sector can do much better in the future.

He added that Switzerland will continue to support the Ghanaian cocoa industry.

Managing Director of QCC, Samuel Maxwell Nana Kakari Addo, outlined some benefits of the accreditations.

He stated it will lead to timely documentation of inspection data, adding that the accreditations have assured the global market of premium quality cocoa from Ghana.

Source: ISD

COCOBOD, China signs agreement for establishment of Cocoa processing factory in Sefwi-Wiawso

The Ghana Cocoa Board (COCOBOD) has signed an agreement with the China General Technology (Group) Holding (Genertec) for the establishment of a cocoa processing factory in Ghana.The factory, which will be located at Sefwi-Wiawso in the Western North Region will be operated by COCOBOD and Genertec through a Public Private Partnership (PPP).Implementation of the plan for the construction of the cocoa processing factory will involve the China International Development Operating Agency, with funding from the China Development Bank (CDB) and the Sino-African Fund.

The project holds great potential to contribute significantly to the improvement of the Ghanaian economy, and particularly, for the local economy of the Sefwi-Wiawso area, said the Chief Executive of COCOBOD, Hon Joseph Boahen Aidoo, in his address to the Chinese delegation led by the country’s Ambassador to Ghana, Mr Zhou Wang. The signing ceremony took place at the Cocoa House in Accra.

The project, Hon. Aidoo added, also has the potential to grant Ghana access to the huge Chinese market of well over a billion people. There lies a unique opportunity to reach several-million consumers of cocoa made and processed in Ghana.

“This is a project that is going to benefit both countries,” he said with some glee. “It is going to be of mutual benefit; a win-win situation. Ghana will benefit and of course, China will as well benefit.”

Hon. Aidoo said the project will also aid in COCOBOD’s drive towards increasing local consumption and more importantly, it fits into the agenda of the present government, that Ghana should increase its share of the USD$ 100 billion global cocoa industry through value addition to cocoa beans.

“It is a matter of taking a bigger part of the global value chain, worth over USD$ 100 billion annually. Once the comprehensive feasibility studies are completed, we are looking forward to the commencement of the project.”

On his part, Mr Tan Xinghui, the Vice President of Genertec said the company already has some foothold in the Ghanaian cocoa sector spanning some 15 years, however, the establishment of the cocoa processing plant commences a new model of corporation between Ghana and China.

Although, China has invested in other sectors of Ghana, they are yet looking for other opportunities where the two countries can cooperate for mutual profit and a deepening of relations.

“We regard Ghana as the regional hub”, Mr Tan Xinghui added. “We believe that our portfolio in Ghana is not yet enough, so, basically we are looking forward to expanding our investment here in Ghana and that is why we are here today.”

The Chairman of the Board of Directors of COCOBOD, Mr. Hackman Owusu Agyeman, was grateful for the co-operation and was hopeful that the project will commence in due time to achieve the objective of expanding the consumption of cocoa in the country.

He was positive that the mutual relationship between the two countries will be further strengthened.

SOURCE : BestNewsGH.com and www.facebook.com/jbaidooofficial/

EU backs cocoa price rise to make production more sustainable

Higher prices are needed to ensure cocoa production becomes more sustainable, a senior European Union official said on Tuesday, backing plans by top growers Ivory Coast and Ghana to levy a “living income differential” on sales.

“Ivory Coast and Ghana can count on the EU in their price floor initiative,” Regis Meritan of the trading bloc’s directorate-general for International Cooperation and Development told Reuters on the sidelines of a meeting organised by the International Cocoa Organization (ICCO).

 

The West African neighbours, who together produce two-thirds of the world’s cocoa, imposed a fixed “living income differential” of $400 a tonne in July on all cocoa sales for the 2020/21 season.

The move, a bid to ease pervasive farmer poverty, child labour and deforestation, was a major overhaul in how cocoa is priced globally.

“This initiative affects the price and we are convinced that without a significant increase in price we will not be able to change the paradigm,” Meritan, team leader on rural development, food security and nutrition, said.

Meritan said it would not be a problem for chocolate makers to pay more for cocoa as long as their competitors also faced higher costs. Major chocolate makers include Barry Callebaut AG , Mondelez International Inc and Nestle SA .

“If they all pay together more…the one who will ultimately pay more is the consumer,” he said.

Meritan welcomed the ongoing dialogue on the pricing scheme involving traders, producing countries and chocolate makers.

“Two years ago in 2017 in Brussels it was impossible with the industry to talk about the price and on the side of the producing countries it was not easy to make them say that if the price was low, it was because there was too much cocoa on the market,” he said.

“Today we are in a much healthier discussion.”

SOURCE : REUTERS

What do farmers and the ICCO think of Ghana and Côte d’Ivoire’s minimum cocoa price?

 

The World Cocoa Farmers Organization (WCFO) is asking Ghana and Côte d’Ivoire to reconsider setting a minimum cocoa price, while the International Cocoa Organization (ICCO) is surprised the price was not higher.

The West African nations last week proposed minimum price of $2,600 per tonne of cocoa beans and suspended forward sales for the 2020/21 season until this floor price is implemented.

Speaking to Lumina Intelligence’s Sustainable Food & Drink Podcast , Sako Warren, secretary general of the WCFO, an 800,000-strong member organization of smallholders and farmer groups, said: “We believe that farmers should be the ones to communicate with their partners on what price they should sell their crop.

“We don’t think having a fixed ceiling is the answer.

“…We are more concerned about how farmers will get that money.”

ICCO expected $3,000

The International Cocoa Organization (ICCO) – a member organisation for cocoa consuming and producing countries, was not part of the floor price discussions.

But also speaking to the podcast, Michel Arrion, executive director of the ICCO, welcomed the move and said he would have expected a higher price.

“I was more expecting something around $3,000,” he said.

The new ICCO executive director, who was appointed in October 2018, said world market prices had declined dramatically since 1972 from around $15,000 per MT to $2,400 today.

“There’s nothing wrong in saying we need an increase,” he said.

“If a farmer produces one ton of cocoa per year the average income will be $2,400 a year, so it’s $200 a month which is well below the poverty line if you consider the cocoa grower is feeding seven or eight people in the household.”

Arrion hopes the minimum floor price will lead to an increased farmgate price that would support farmer income.

‘A manifest injustice’

Warren said any additional money from the minimum floor price should go to farmers as income rather than be invested in infrastructure.

WCFO’s press release is available in full below.

The president of Ghana said in a press release the minimum price protection aims to address “a manifest injustice”,   a $100bn chocolate industry where less than 5.75% of the value goes to the hard work of farmers, who often live in poverty.

WCFO calls for the world price for farmers

WCFO suggests farmers should receive the floor price for cocoa rather than the farmgate price.

Côte d’Ivoire’s farmgate price for the main crop last year equates to $1,281 per MT – representing 58% of the average world market price ($2,207 – Average of ICCO’s monthly averages of daily prices from October 2018 to end of March 2019).

In Ghana the main crop farmgate price was $1,407 per ton or 64% of average world market prices.

“Farmers are the business people who produce what they produce and have to sell it. So why should they have the farmgate price and not the actual price?” Warren asked.

WCFO is calling for governments to tax farmer income rather than to set a farmgate price.

“When farmers are better off they will improve the economies of their countries ,” said Warren.

Cocoa economies

Cocoa is a big contributor to the Gross Domestic Product (GDP) of Ghana and Côte d’Ivoire.

Cocoa beans – excluding cocoa butter, power and finished chocolate – generated $3.8bn for Côte d’Ivoire in 2017 making it the country’s top export, accounting for 37% of exports by value, according to OEC figures.

In Ghana, cocoa beans are the third largest export by value, making up 10% of exports or $1.8bn.

Next steps

WCFO will publish a roadmap on how farmers can be part of discussions in September at its conference, the Second Global Cocoa Farmers Conference (GCFC2), which runs from 25 to 26 September 2019 in Abidjan, Côte d’Ivoire.

The Ghana Cocoa Board (Cocobod) said in a press release , a technical meeting will be held on 3 July 2019 in Abidjan to fine tune how the floor price will be implemented.

The release also said other issues, such as traceability, the environment and child labour will be decoupled from the floor price discussions.

SOURCE: CONFECTIONERY NEWS